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discussion – Used the website and other to help with the discussion questions. Longest, B. B., & Darr, K. (2014). Managing health services organizations an

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discussion – Used the website and other to help with the discussion questions. Longest, B. B., & Darr, K. (2014). Managing health services organizations and systems )6th ed). Baltimore, MD: Health Professions Press.
Hakanen, M., & Soudunsaari, A. (2012). Building trust in high-performing teams. Technology Innovation Management Review, 2(6), 38–41.
Healey, B. J., & Marchese, M. C. (2012). Foundations of health care management: Principles and methods. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
1. Workforce Analysis
For this discussion question, review the scenario presented in the Vila Health: Human Resources multimedia piece.
The operating room (OR) at your hospital has seen an increase in surgical cases. As a result of the increase, the OR schedule is unable to accommodate new elective cases for approximately two months. To accommodate patient demands and not lose business, the nurse manager would like to open two additional operating suites; however, due to lack of staff, she is unable to do so. For your initial response to the discussion, respond to the following:

What information does the nurse manager need to conduct an analysis of the current workforce?
Once all information is obtained, how will the nurse manager create a business case for the staffing need? One approach would be to return on investment versus the cost to staff.

Finally, discuss the implications of not anticipating future needs of the organization, addressing the patient demand on the organization, the need for additional services, and staffing. Support your response with findings from the literature.
2. Staffing Alternatives
Once a staffing need has been acknowledged, the decision must be made as to the appropriate employment type suited for the identified need. Options include full time, part time, per diem outsourcing and in the case of physicians, locum tenens. For your initial response to the below discussion question:

Pick two employment types and define each.
Identify the positives and negatives of each employment type you identified.

3. Competitive Advantages Through Workforce Diversity
Changes in demographics of the United States population require organizations to develop and cultivate teams that reflect the characteristics and cultures of the patients they serve. Diversity and inclusion among the health care workforce, considered a strategic necessity by the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE), is an innovative necessity for organizations to deliver value and reduce disparities that currently exist. For your initial response, address the following:

Discuss what a high-performing, highly diverse team is.
Discuss why diversity should be everyone’s responsibility within the organization.
Identify the implications of not cultivating and sustaining a diverse workforce for the organization as well as the consumers.
Examine how culture and diversity can leverage the organization to make innovative strategic decisions.

Requirements: 800-900 words Print

Vila Health: Human Resources

·
Introduction

·
Emergency Room

·
PICU

·
Hospital Conference Room

·
Conclusion

·
Credits

Introduction

Human Resources

St. Anthony Medical Center (SAMC) is the third largest hospital in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metro area. Not only does SAMC serve as the main teaching hospital in the area, it also offers care to the community’s most vulnerable populations, including low-income and uninsured residents.
Like many hospitals across the country, nursing shortages and revenue shortfalls make staffing a particular challenge.
Today, a chemical spill caused by a train derailment is highlighting some already tight staffing levels, and so are some other patient situations. Explore the various locations in St. Anthony Medical Center (SAMC), paying attention to how staffing issues are affecting the staff nurses and the nursing leadership.

Emergency Room

Caleb Harvey, the ER nurse manager, has to address the apparent “turfing” of a pregnant patient by another hospital and other concerns during a very busy time.

Caleb deals with staffing issues.

Caleb Harvey, ER Nurse Manager: I called Ramona about getting more staff, but I had to leave a voice message. Until she gets back to me, Emilio, I need you to go with Dr. Cartwright to get Mrs. Kalombo up to Labor & Delivery. Tell Juan that I need him on triage until you get back. Victor is already on beds 1-4 and Juan can go back to covering 5 – 8 when you’re back on the floor.

Emilio Boggio, ER Nurse: Got it.

Robert: Agreed.

Nathan Cartwright: Emilio, they just called down from L&D, they’re ready for us to bring her up.

Sarah Kalombo, a patient who speaks French but not English, tries to make herself understood.

Sarah Kalombo (Originally in French): Don’t send me away again. I am not going to have this baby in the middle of the street. I’ll push this baby out now if I have to. Don’t send me away.

Nathan Cartwright (Originally in French): Of course not. You need to stop pushing and try to relax. We need you to slow down and let your baby come in its own time.

Sarah Kalombo (Originally in French): You won’t put me out on the street?

Nathan Cartwright (Originally in French): No. Of course not. What gave you such an idea?

Sarah Kalombo (Originally in French): The others. At Regency Hospital. I told them I have no insurance and the doctor told me I had to leave and come here.

Nathan Cartwright (Originally in French): He what?

Sarah Kalombo (Originally in French): He said I wasn’t ready, so I should come here. The nurse, she didn’t agree, I could tell, but he said no, I was not ready and I had to leave.

Nathan Cartwright: Caleb, this doesn’t make sense to me. Mrs. Kalombo says that Regency sent her here when she told them she didn’t have insurance.

Caleb Harvey: Sorry, but I’m not shocked. Nathan, tell her she needs to stop pushing.

Nathan Cartwright (Originally in French): Mrs. Kalombo, you need to stop pushing. I promise, we will help you deliver your baby, but try to not push.

Caleb Harvey: Welcome to your first turfing. Now, go ask Maria where the heck the OB doc is. If we don’t get this woman up to L and D quick, you’re going to be doing your first delivery before you finish your first shift.

Informational Materials

The informational materials on the computer are optional, but will inform your understanding of the situation:

·
Staffing Policy and Procedures

·
Staff Utilization Memo

PICU

The PICU is experiencing an unexpected surge because of a train derailment, so Jackie Sandoval is looking for ways to best use the staff she has.

Jackie explains how she is addressing acuity and patient load.

Jackie Sandoval, St. Anthony Medical Center’s Chief Nursing Officer: Okay, I’ve pulled three beds from med-surg to handle the pediatric overflow. We’ve already transferred two patients from pediatrics to med-surg, so once we get that last patient transferred you should have three pediatric beds to move Dr. Adams’ patients out and make room for any new admissions from the ER.
Staffing is extremely tight. Once you move those three kids out to pediatrics, your acuity should drop somewhat. How does your staffing look?

Phoebe Hemsworth, PICU Nurse Supervisor: We’re short 2 nurses for evening and 3 for the night shift. I’ve called everyone in who’s available, but we’re still short. And that nurse you sent up from med-surg took one look around and left. She said she wasn’t trained for this kind of work and didn’t feel comfortable accepting the assignment—particularly under these circumstances. Can you get somebody with PICU, or even just ICU training?

Jackie Sandoval: I’m sorry about that! I thought Anita would be fine up here. I’ll see what I can do. Have you heard anything from the ER regarding possible new admits to PICU?

Phoebe Hemsworth: I’ve only heard of one possible admit so far… maybe coming up in 15 minutes or so. We may be catching a little breathing room.

Jackie Sandoval: I wouldn’t count on it. There were three ambulances on the way in when I came up here. Let me touch base with them… Wait a sec. I’ve got a text from med-surg. Let me call Mary and see what’s up.

Phoebe Hemsworth: Sure. I’ll give the ER a call and see what’s pending.

Informational Materials

The informational materials on the computer are optional, but will inform your understanding of the situation:

·
Staffing Policy and Procedures

·
Staff Utilization Memo

Email to the Nurse Managers

To: SAMC *Nurse Manager List

From: Jackie Sandoval, Chief Nursing Officer

Subject: Scheduling for All Shifts

Good morning,
Please review your staffing for the next three shifts and let me know if you have any room for me to make shifts available to the three units that are currently very short-handed (ER, PICU, and Adult ICU).
Use the ANA Staffing Utilization guidelines as much as possible, but remember that we are dealing with surge conditions.
Thank you for your help!

Email from Ramona Mitchell to Phoebe Hemsworth

To: Phoebe Hemsworth

From: Ramona Mitchell

Subject: FW: Scheduling for All Shifts

Good morning,
Phoebe-
I just spoke with Jackie and we’re still trying to get you some help for the remainder of this shift and for the evening shift. Anita Hanson is on her way over. She was assigned to med-surg and floats to the ER on occasion. I think she’ll be fine.

Hospital Conference Room

In a Hospital Conference Room, the leadership discuss the staffing and language issues that hospital employees are struggling with.
Jackie tries to explain the organizational problems that are impeding quality care at the hospital.

Jackie Sandoval, Chief Nursing Officer: I’ve got some issues that are really dragging us down. Which do you want to talk about first?

George Fink, Director of Clinical Operations: Let’s start with staffing—where are we? We should be better off once all the chemical spill patients are stabilized, right?

Jackie Sandoval: Well, the spill caused a surge in patients, but I want to make something very clear: Even if it hadn’t, we still would have been stretched thin. I called in additional staff for most of the units today, but I’ve had to do that several times in the last few weeks. Even before the chemical spill, I had to pull 3 beds in med-surg for pediatric overflow because we’re short on pediatric nurses. Acuity is up on all units and we have 23 beds left.

George Fink: Sounds like you have a pretty good handle on it.

Jackie Sandoval: For now, yes. But we regularly exhaust the PRN nurse pool, and I’ve been leaning heavily on the temporary staffing agencies in the area for months. It is just not enough. We could and probably should look into identifying nurses and health care staff from other facilities who could come over and help in crisis situations like this, but I’d argue that that’s a good strategy for emergency conditions. We need more resources during ordinary conditions!

Geoffrey Vaughn, President and CEO: Well, I don’t know. Budget for new staff isn’t really available right now. The staff for the new diabetes outpatient center added considerably to our payroll outlays, and I’m not sure what we can do.

George Fink: In theory, shouldn’t that center and others like it lighten the load at the ER? I think that was part of the rationale for shifting budget over to the center in the first place.

Jackie Sandoval: In theory, yes, but I don’t know. The diabetes center doesn’t keep ER hours, does it? People will continue to come to us when the center isn’t open or available, and patients with diabetes-related symptoms are only one segment of our overall traffic.

George Fink: Well, and there’s also a pretty long wait time for appointments at the center. We’re up to our elbows in baby boomers with chronic conditions in this city!

Jackie Sandoval: Exactly. And if those people are waiting for an appointment and have foot problems or other associated conditions, they’re coming to the ER. Not to mention things like DKA or a stroke!

Geoffrey Vaughn: That’s not good. We don’t want to lose business to other hospitals in the area because the center is understaffed. Or is this a capacity issue?

George Fink: Good question. I don’t know whether the center is operating at peak capacity, or if there’s space that’s going unused because they don’t have the staff yet.

Geoffrey Vaughn: All right, so what’s the language problem?

Jackie Sandoval: Yes… it’s always a problem; it’s one of our weakest areas, quite frankly. CLAS guidelines are perfectly clear, but we still run into problems with LEP patients. Last week we had an elderly Hmong woman who had her grandson interpreting for her. The problem was that she was presenting with gynecological issues—she didn’t want to be examined in the first place and both of them were embarrassed and were unwilling to actually say what was going on. Juan offered to page the interpreter, but she insisted that she wanted her grandson and since he wasn’t a minor, we had to accept her wishes.
We got lucky with a patient who was about to give birth – she spoke French and so did the nurse. But today we’re getting a flood of calls from Regency, and Maria is the only admin person who speaks Spanish. She’s getting pulled in twenty different directions. Obviously, I can help with some things, but …

Geoffrey Vaughn: Do we have a process in place for finding interpreters?

Jackie Sandoval: Yes, but what we need is an aggressive effort on hiring multilingual nurses—particularly for our Hmong and Somali populations. Those are two groups that are really not being well served.

George Fink: Are there that many multilingual nurses out there?

Jackie Sandoval: I don’t know. We would find out if we made a point of hiring them, though.

Geoffrey Vaughn: Do you mean hiring to replace, or new hires? Like I said earlier, we may or may not have any budget for that.

Informational Materials

The informational materials on the computer are optional, but will inform your understanding of the situation:

·
Staffing Policy and Procedures

·
Staff Utilization Memo

Email from Geoffrey Vaughn

To: Owen Welch

CC: Jackie Sandoval

From: Geoffrey Vaughn, President and CEO

Subject: Staffing analysis

Owen,
We need to take another look at staffing numbers. I don’t think we have a handle yet on traffic at the ER and our outpatient diabetes center. We’ve got some high temp staff usage at the ER and a long wait at the center, so an analysis of our projections and how they’re matching up with reality is in order. How quickly can you get this done?
– Geoffrey

Email from Jackie Sandoval

To: SAMC *Nursing Staff

From: Jackie Sandoval, Chief Nursing Officer

Subject: CLAS Standards and Cultural Competency

Everyone:
Please remember that quality health care depends on clear communication. Both from the standpoint of delivering the highest quality care and of liability, we need to be consistent in providing culturally competent care, particularly in terms of the right of our LEP patients to interpretation services.
If you are unsure about how to provide culturally sensitive care or how to obtain interpreter assistance, please review the CLAS standards and the appropriate sections of the hospital policy and procedures manual. If those don’t answer your questions, please meet with your nursing supervisor.

Email from Jackie Sandoval

To: SAMC *All

From: Jackie Sandoval, Chief Nursing Officer

Subject: Hospital Interpreters

Everyone:
In light of several recent incidents, it is clear that we need to increase our readiness to better serve our LEP patients. Many of our employees could help with this effort by self-identifying their proficiency in languages other than English.
We will soon be sending out a survey to determine which staff members have proficiency in languages other than English. Please fill it out and return it as soon as possible, so that we can work toward providing better care for all of our patients.
Thank you for your assistance.

Conclusion

You have visited all the locations in this activity. You may revisit the locations or you may leave Vila Health and return to your courseroom.

To: From: Re: Nurse Managers Jackie Sandoval, Chief Nursing Officer Utilization Staffing issues are an ongoing issue in our profession and they have grown more complex for many reasons, including shortages of practicing and teaching nurses. Combined with that, the aging of both nursing and patient populations, increasing health care costs, and competition for financial resources put more pressure on the profession. Such pressures to provide quality nursing care to increasingly sicker or older patients require that we continue to look for increased efficiency and strategy for our staffing issues. One resource that will help with these questions is the ANA Staff Utilization guide. If you do not have access to a hard copy of this publication, the ANA makes it available online: http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ThePracticeofProfessionalNursing/workpl ace/NurseShortageStaffing/UtilizationGuide.aspx If there are questions, please feel free to contact me at 612 944-1993.

Vila Health: Human Resources
Welcome to the Vila Health Challenge!

First, view the Vila Health media activity. When complete, return here to answer the questions.

Refer to the media activity as much as needed to help you answer the questions.

Scenario Vila Health: Human Resources
Today, a chemical spill caused by a train derailment is highlighting some already tight staffing levels, and so are some other patient situations. Explore the various locations in St. Anthony Medical Center (SAMC), paying attention to how staffing issues are affecting the staff nurses and the nursing leadership.

Vila Health – Human Resources 

Knowledge Check
Now that you have completed the Vila Health scenario and reviewed the resources, write a short answer for each question in the box. Once you have finished writing your answer, select Submit for feedback. Compare your answer to the feedback. You can always review the Vila Health simulation again, or the study resources, for further clarification.

Question 1 of 4
Describe the role of human resources in health care settings.

This question has not yet been answered.

The human resources department manages the processes by which the health care organization identifies, recruits, manages, and trains staff. Human resources also manages employee payroll and benefits, and conflict resolution.

Question 2 of 4
Explain the benefits of having an employee workflow plan in a health care setting.

This question has not yet been answered.

Employee workflow is the process of completing tasks from start to finish. In a busy health care setting it is important that employees understand the steps and processes involved in completing tasks, including the delivery of high-quality patient care. Typical tasks in a hospital setting, for example, include making rounds, scheduling ADLs for patients, discharge planning, and patient information entry into the electronic health record system, among others.

Question 3 of 4
Explain why employers need to pay close attention to the health care setting’s workforce.

This question has not yet been answered.

Often, worker shortages can create backlogs in health care settings. External variables, such as the aging population or growing population centers, create increased demand on health care organizations, especially hospital settings. It is important that managers have a workforce plan in place to ensure staff shortages are easily or quickly resolved or avoided altogether.

Question 4 of 4

Why is it important to work with the human resources department on workforce?

This question has not yet been answered.

The human resources team is trained to handle recruiting and staffing issues. Managers do need to work very closely with them, however, to ensure human resources personnel understand the specific job duties, credentials, and requirements for open positions.

Print

Vila Health: Human Resources

·

Introduction

·

Emerge

ncy Room

·

PICU

·

Hospit

al Conference Room

·

Conclusion

·

Credits

Introduction

Human Resources

St. Anthony Medical Center (SAMC) is the third largest hospital in the Minneapolis

St. Paul

metro area. Not only does SAMC serve as the main teaching hospital in the area, it also offers

care to the

community’s most vulnerable populations, including low

income and uninsured

residents.

Print
Vila Health: Human Resources
 Introduction
 Emergency Room
 PICU
 Hospital Conference Room
 Conclusion
 Credits

Introduction
Human Resources
St. Anthony Medical Center (SAMC) is the third largest hospital in the Minneapolis-St. Paul
metro area. Not only does SAMC serve as the main teaching hospital in the area, it also offers
care to the community’s most vulnerable populations, including low-income and uninsured
residents.

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